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Buffalo Nickel Club
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Some info from Coin Facts. 

Experts speculate that the 1914/3 Nickel was caused when a 1913 dated master die was repunched with a 1914 dated hub. This theory is supported by the fact that there are several different overdate dies, plus overdates reported for both the 1914-D and 1914-S Nickels. The strongest 1914/3 die from the Philadelphia mint is known as FS-101 (old FS-014.87). The closeup illustrated above is from a different die and shows doubling on all digits of the date, plus a fairly strong top of the 3. Value for this variety depends on the strength (visibility of the doubling). Thus, the FS-101 commands the highest premium. Other, less visible overdates command smaller premiums.

 

https://www.pcgs.com/coinfacts/coin/1914-3-5c/93924


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coinquest1961
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Many feel this is a legitimate overdate, In addition to myself, this would include Bill Fivaz, Mike Ellis, Larry Briggs, and others. I believe Tom (Buffnix) also accepts that belief. Dr. James Wiles of CONECA has yet to make a determination as he needs to see a Mint State EDS specimen before he makes up his mind. As soon as I can figure out how to attach an image of a very convincing example from my book I will post it here.

This post was modified 9 months ago by coinquest1961

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Buffalo Nickel Club
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Posted by: @coinquest1961

Many feel this is a legitimate overdate, In addition to myself, this would include Bill Fivaz, Mike Ellis, Larry Briggs, and others. I believe Tom (Buffnix) also accepts that belief. Dr. James Wiles of CONECA has yet to make a determination as he needs to see a Mint State EDS specimen before he makes up his mind. As soon as I can figure out how to attach an image of a very convincing example from my book I will post it here.

Welcome and thank you. We look forward to any information you’d like to share. 


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coinquest1961
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For some reason my post above is incomplete so I'll finish it here.

 

My name is Ron Pope. I am 72 years old and I've been collecting Buffalo nickels for sixty years. I live in Ohio with my wife, Colleen. We will have been married for 50 years next year.

 

I have co-authored a book on the Buffalo nickel doubled dies with John Wexler and Kevin Flynn, published twice in 1999 and again in 2006. I have also written two books on my own-one on the abraded die stage varieties-the 3 and 3 1/2 legged, two feather, missing initial anomalies among other varieties and a second one concerning a detailed study of the strike characteristics of the series.

 

I would have joined sooner but I first heard of this site via the E-Sylum. I look forward to contributing here often.

 

                                                       Ron


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Buffalo Nickel Club
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@coinquest1961 We look forward to your expert advice. Thank you. 


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coinquest1961
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I need to know how to post images.


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coinquest1961
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There is another possible cause of the overdate, first suggested by Tom DeLorey, that an unfinished 1913 die was hubbed with a die dated 1914. I think either could be the cause. In the case of an overdated 1913 die it would have had to occur on a working hub due to the number of different dies (currently 11, most of which are very weak) that are known for the variety. There are three significant dies showing a clear crossbar of the "3"-Dies # 1, 2, and three. Nearly all of these show evidence of effacement marks indicating that an attempt was made to remove the underdigit.


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coinquest1961
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I also have a much better and convincing image of Die #1 of the overdate.


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Buffalo Nickel Club
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Here an image from PCGS’s coin facts. 

It’s been graded as MS66

 
 

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Buffalo Nickel Club
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@coinquest1961 

There should be an “Attach File” button at the bottom of the comment box. There you can add jpeg files. 


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coinquest1961
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I have tried that without success. I see the file size limit is 10 MB. The file I want to post is only 159 KB. I will try again tomorrow.


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coinquest1961
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Die #1. Overlays by Dr James Wiles. To me, this image is very convincing. PCGS will attribute this and most of Die #2.

This post was modified 9 months ago by coinquest1961

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coinquest1961
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coinquest1961
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Die #3. Another convincing image.

This post was modified 9 months ago by coinquest1961

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coinquest1961
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It was definitely not the result of an overdated master die. If that was the case then every 1914 nickel would be an overdate. An overdated working hub could account for it since a working hub would produce a number of working dies. NGC apparently dosen't recognize it as an overdate but PCGS does. I think both ANACS and ICG also recognize it.


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